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Beginning this summer and throughout the fall semester, we are working to upgrade the research experience by making ongoing improvements to our Research Guides.
You may encounter changes in the look and feel of the Research Guides website along with structural changes to our existing guides. If you have any questions or concerns about this process please let us know.

Open Educational Resources

Publishing Platforms and Guides for Authors

Communities

Learn more about OER by connecting with various communities through listservs, newsletters and conferences.

Guides to Authoring OER Textbooks

Authoring Platforms and Software.

Many online sites and platforms are available for anyone who wants to create an OER. See the following links for these sites and their features.

Creative Commons Licenses

Creative Commons Licenses

Image Attribution: Wikimedia Commons under a CC BY-SA 3.0 license.

About Creative Commons.  Creative Commons (CC) is a nonprofit organization that enables the sharing and use of creative works and knowledge through their CC licenses.  CC licenses allow work to be reused without permission when certain conditions are fulfilled.  CC licenses are standardized, free to use, and have been applied to over 1 billion copyrighted works and across 9 million web sites. They have been found to be legally valid in many jurisdictions and countries.

CC licenses have 4 conditions (BY, SA, NC and ND) and their works can be licensed in 6 different ways.  See the chart above for more details.

Creative Commons for Faculty and Instructors.  Did you find an OER or other work with a CC license and want to use it for your instruction or for scholarly activity?  You are allowed to reuse it without permission as long as conditions of the license are followed.

Creative Commons for Creators.  You can freely share your work an OER and keep your copyright.  The most common way to make your work an OER is to add a Creative Commons (CC) license to it.  The CC license you choose describes conditions for your work to be shared, distributed or remixed. If anyone wants to use your work beyond the conditions of your CC license, they would need your permission.